Palisades Amusement Park The legendary Palisades Amusement Park was the grandaddy of all amusement parks/penny arcades. Immortalized by the hit Freddy Cannon record, "Palisades Park', it sat on a cliff in New Jersey overlooking New York City and entertained crowds from all over the world from 1898 until it was closed and demolished in 1971 inorder to build a condominium complex. I have very fond memories of my visits to Palisades Park and recently was fortunate enough to meet Mr. John Rinaldi who was the last superintendant of the park from 1964 until 1971. Mr. Rinaldi had met his now wife while working at Palisades Park, her family owned the Penny Arcade concession! John Rinaldi very generously supplied me with several artifacts from this magical place. I also obtained artifacts from former park employee's and their relatives. On September 26, 1998 a small park was constructed at the site of the former entrance to Palisades Park. A permanent bronze plaque commemorating the park is located at the site. During the dedication ceremony, a identical plaque was used by officials for presentation. I am proud to now have this plaque. The only existing dedication plaque other than at the park itself. The plaque is pictured below. Also pictured are: * The sign used at the guess your weight/age booth which hung at the park for many many years. * A sign from the Parking lot indicating directions to the shuttle bus. * A collection of memorabilia from the park. The midway Dart Game darts, Cards from Pat and Gary's Candy stand and Jewelry stand. A money bag for the park, a money bag for Cliffside Caterers (who ran many of the concessions) and a Palisades Park banner. Palisades Park, oh how we miss you...
  • Click here to view enlarged dedication plaque
  • Click here to view Guess Your Age Booth Sign
  • Click here to view Parking Lot sign
  • Click here to view Various Park Memorabilia
  • Original Side Show Banner. Traveling carnival side shows, once the mainstay of midways everywhere have all but faded into history. The great 10 in 1 shows featuring multiple acts as well as 'blow offs' which tried to extract additional money from patrons for additional entertainment provided amusment for all. Outside the side shows were hand painted colorful banners on canvas which visually announced the wonders to be seen within. This banner 'Flamo, the fire eater' was painted by John Frazier, a third generation show painter. John has been a circus performer as well as a owner of the Royal Bros Circus and the Fisher Bros Circus. The banner was created in the traditional manner utilizing oils on canvas. Modern show painters tend to use acrylics on vinyl which are not as durable. This particular banner was custom made for the late Jim Nordmark, a well known producer in the circus business to hang in the circus room of his Sarasota, FL home. Unfortunately, Mr. Nordmark passed away before Mr. Frazier was able to complete the banner. I was fortunate to aquire this beautiful work of art in 2004.
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  • Original Circus Sign. This clown clock sign was hand painted by noted circus artist Harvey Copeland of Sarasota Florida in the late 1960's. Copeland is known for his elaborate circus art. The sign was painted for and used by the Hoxie Brothers Circus which toured the country from the 1950's until the early 1980's. The sign was used at the circus's main entrance to indicate the start time of the next show. In the early 1980's, the circus was sold to Allen C. Hill who renamed it to Hoxie's Great American Circus. Later he changed the name again to Allen C. Hill's Great American Circus. If you ever attended a Hoxie Circus show at a fair grounds or parking lot you may remember this sign.
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  • 1931 Gottlieb Baffle Ball Sr. Home Version. Demand for Gottliebs Baffle Ball pin game was so great that Dave Gottlieb decided to also produce non coin operated home versions of the game. These home versions were similar to bagatelle's but incorporated the playfield design of the arcade version of Baffle Ball.
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  • This is a actual gypsy fortune tellers sign which I have hanging in my gameroom. I rescued the sign from being destroyed as the Gypsy's old storefront was being torn down to make way for a new office building.
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  • 1940's Punch Board. Variations of these boards were extremely common in the 1940's at taverns. The player purchases a certain number of holes. These are then punched out and slips of paper removed which contain numbers. These numbers are matched against the payout chart printed on the front of the game and money paid out to winners accordingly.
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  • 1940 Jack-Pot-Game. This game was produced by Buffalo Toy and Tool Works of Buffalo, New York. It was intended to be a toy and not a commercial trade stimulator. However, it accepts penny size tokens and after the handle is pulled, the reels spin and a chart printed on the machine specifies payoff's based on what symbols are showing.
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  • 1950's Automatic Electric Payphone. What penny arcade is complete without a old three slot payphone? I also collect many old telephones as a hobby.
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  • 1940's Toy Mutoscope Device. Often commercial coin operated machines spawned home-use work-alikes. This is a tin toy which internally has a reel of pictures. When the crank on the right side is turned, gears cause the pictures to be flashed sequentially in front of the viewer created a animated cartoon. The operation and design of this toy is very similar to a Mutoscope movie viewer (see the arcade section of this website for a picture and descripton of one).
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